Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Web Therapy

I recently listened to a segment during my morning commute, on NPR, about Web Therapy. First of all, web therapy is online counseling, usually via video conferencing with a professional therapist.

I can already hear the older generation making snide remarks about what a joke it is or how phony it sounds, but I might disagree. There are many aspects to this topic and I hope to provide you at least an understanding for why people would participate in such an activity.

First of all, our generation has not had to wait for anything. Prescriptions are ready the moment you walk out of the Dr. Office, Chinese is delivered to your front door, gas is sold at nearly every intersection, pictures can be printed the moment you take them, and Pomegranate Lemonade Green Tea is available at your local grocery store. Point being, there's not much we need to wait for, which has made us a more efficient society (at least how I see it). I don't have to waste 2 hours of my time driving to the Apple store to buy a car charger for my phone. I just open my eBay app and purchase a new cord with a few clicks and it will be delivered to my house as soon as tomorrow. Point being; why waste transit time to visit a therapist, when you could just open your computer, sign on and begin therapy? Maybe those 15 minutes saved from driving turns into a 15 minute cardio workout.

In manufacturing, if an assembler has to walk 100ft across the plant to get a tool, we consider that to be waste and find every way to eliminate it. It's not called being lazy, its called productivity.

I know I'm switching topics without a good transition, but as I love saying, this is my blog and how I think and want to convey. I'm not forcing you to read.
Anyways, the security of web therapy can be questioned and rightly so. If that's something you're concerned about, maybe it isn't for you, which is okay. I, personally, don't have anything so horrible I wouldn't want someone else hearing, but that's just me.

I spoke with someone briefly about this topic and they said that web therapy is just a tool for those addicted to being online. First of all, I think that being "addicted to being online" is relative. What does that mean? My family would certainly say that I'm addicted to being online, but how much does that effect my relationships? I'd say it doesn't (of course I would). How are my online habits compared to others with different online habits and so on? At what point is being online bad? If I, for example, need professional help and am only willing to talk to someone online, I would certainly say that is better than not going. So why would you discourage web therapy?

I think that technology has so much further to go and so many more uses to be pursued that no matter what, it will be a topic of debate.  We have already seen the controversy it causes and this is just the beginning.

Berea